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Hi from Orcas Island, Washington State

Started by OrcasGirl, June 03, 2010, 11:09:32 pm

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OrcasGirl

Although I'm an internet junkie, this is the first forum I've ever joined.  I live on 5 acres a beautiful island in north Puget Sound and am working on designing my dream garden/landscape that will keep me enchanted the rest of my life. :) The entire property is covered with moss and it has a very peaceful feeling. I knew from the beginning that a japanese garden aesthetic would harmonize naturally with the property, and with me too. I have run into a huge design challenge in one area of the property - an open area with large boulders - and haven't found anyone qualified locally to help. I'm hoping to share some photos and get some ideas so I can move forward with a plan for this area. I tend to obsess about a plan, and if I can't get it to feel right on paper then I never implement it - I'm too afraid of making a mistake I suppose!

edzard

Welcome to the forum OrcasGirl..
;D, strangely, stone setting never feels quite the same on paper as it does in situ. I'm hoping that the mandate to only implement if the paper version feels 'right' will not get in the way of your harmonization in the landscape. What size are the 'large boulders??
:), answer that one in the thread you start for the photographs... we'll look forward to it..         edzard

don

Welcome OrcasGirl.  Maybe it will help to know that when it comes to stone arrangements, in 34 years of designing landscapes and gardens, I have never had a design end up following the plan.  I think it is better to try and understand the possibilities, study the stones and their possible relationships with each other and the existing landscape, and then begin.

Looking forward to your pictures

JamesT

Welcome, what an opportunity.

In addition to agreeing with the others, I'd suggest you lift at least one small boulder to see what they look like underneath.  That may affect your plans, one way or another.  If you can include that side in your photos, washed, and not, great.

Wishing you joy in your garden,

James

don

James, it has been tried before, but the stone fairies of Puget have never been legitimately captured on camera.  Or was there another purpose for looking below the boulder?

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