A JAPANESE GARDEN HANDBOOK

by Andrew R. Deane

Part Three: Ancillary Elements

Discussing additional elements that make a garden peculiarly Japanese: Paths, bridges, lanterns, water basins, and stone towers; architecture, gates, walls, fences and borrowed scenery.


 

Table of Contents

Chapter 29: Getting about: Paths
A Stroll through the Garden; Dressing Up; Stepping Out; Cutting a Swath; Stopping Short

Chapter 30: Crossing over: Bridges
Metaphor and Reality; Across the Years; Stone Spans; Wooden Arches

Chapter 31: Lighting the Way: Lanterns
Dispelling Darkness; A Little Illumination; Seven Bits and Pieces; Four Classifications; Eighteen Styles

Chapter 32: Washing away the World: Basins
Origins and Ablutions; Stone Basin; Crouching Down; Basin Styles; Wells and Water Devices

Chapter 33: Detailing the Garden: Towers and Ornaments
Pagodas; Stone Towers; Stone Ornaments; Re-use, Re-cycle

Chapter 34: Placing Man: The Architectural Interface
Essential Principles; Raising the Roof; Walls, Windows and Screens; Guest Rooms; On the Mat; Transitional Zones; Draining the Rain; Garden Delights; Domestic Bliss; Four Architectural Styles; Domestic Bliss; Mad about Town; Castle Complex; Imperial Concerns; Retirement – Imperial Style

Chapter 35: Defining the Garden: Boundaries and Gates
Fencing Practice; Bamboo; Tying the Knot; Board; Brushwood and Bark; Living Fences; Mud, Stone and Tile; Their Entrances and Their Exits; Stoned at the Gate

Chapter 36: Looking beyond: Borrowed Scenery
Borrowing a Backdrop; Incredible Shrinking Scenery; Let Us Now Praise Famous Places; Jetavana’s Bells; Gardens of Repute; Mythic Mountains; Rising from the Ashes


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