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Author Topic: Observing the Masters  (Read 14703 times)

peterm

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2008, 11:23:22 AM »
If I'm able, I'll try and be there on Friday as well.  Right now I'm still not sure of my schedule (sometimes work interferes with my recreational activities)

Healeyjet

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2008, 11:26:25 AM »
That would be great.  It would be nice to meet another forum member.
Ward

edzard

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2008, 02:29:49 PM »
Peter... thank you for your kindness and consideration, I will try to call regardless.
As far as I can tell, tomorrow will not be possible, as I cannot co-ordinate the loose ends between work, farm and other work. With tongue in cheek, if I could nail down one thing the others would follow suit. Hope to catch up with you later.             edzard

Healeyjet

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2008, 12:23:04 PM »
Peter, I see you are back.  How was it?  I am leaving in about 4 hours to be there for Friday and Saturday.
Ward

peterm

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2008, 01:14:18 PM »
Ward, it was extremely informative.  Both Masa and Al are very easy going and very willing to stop and discuss whatever gardening questions you may have.  I did try to get into Saturday's course but it is being held at a different location and is full.  I had an interesting conversation with Masa about pruning and controlling the size of the trees.  He said that allowing trees to grow to their full height is a western notion and that in Japanese gardening the idea is to have a more uniform hight - one feature should not dominate the landscape.  An example that he used was, if you have bungalow style home, any pine trees nearby, should be between 12 and 14 feet high, and not tower over the house.  While I was there, they work working on a scotch pine that they had let go wild, and they now wanted to reduce the size so that it was in line with the bell tower that was nearby.  This is the 3rd year that they have reduced the size and it is now at the height that they want. 
After speaking with them, I feel much more confident in attempting this myself.  Have a safe trip, and let me know what you learnton Saturday
Peter

edzard

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #20 on: July 01, 2008, 09:23:45 PM »
So... Al....
Ward has never surfaced again after Lethbridge...
did you use him for fertilizer? Did Masa prune him too hard???
how was it and should people make a point of coming there for the maple pruning...?
 8) ;D                e

Al

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #21 on: July 02, 2008, 07:23:42 AM »
Good Morning Edzard!

Yeah, I am curious as to Wards' whereabouts.     I hope we didn't turn him off of what we do in the garden :(
Just hope everything is ok and they returned home safe.

As far as the workshop went, I heard it was good, I was not there so its second hand info.

I've asked on a couple of occasions if my assistance was needed at the workshops but was told it was not, so I stay away :(

I suppose it is again up to the individual if they would like to see how we prune the maples. 

Ward, if your out there please respond good or bad, the feedback would be appreciated :)

Thanks
Al

Healeyjet

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #22 on: July 02, 2008, 10:41:03 AM »
I am back at my desk and should have some photos of the trip this afternoon.  It was everything Peter said it would be.
Al, it was a pleasure to be in your garden.  The only thing negative I can say about the trip was that it went too fast. 
For the rest of you, the day spent with Al and Masa was very informative and just downright fun!  If you ever get the opportunity to spend an hour or two in the garden with these two it is well worth the time. Both are more than willing to come down from the mount (the ladder) and explain what they are doing and why.  Al and Masa are very knowledgeable and more than willing to share their knowledge with people asking questions. It is probably too quick to go back for the maple pruning in two weeks but Annie and I will be back probably next year for another session.
Edzard, thanks for the time that you spent with Annie and I.  You are very knowledgeable and filled our heads with all sorts of ideas.  If we weren't confused with the array of possibilities before, we are now.  We have to step back and learn to enjoy the process more.  We want the process of garden design to remove stress not add to it.  We are taking all of your ideas and talking about them still.  We probably won't start anything in the yard this year except to maybe plant some trees to get a years growth on them.
The workshop was very fun as well.  We met some great people.  It was a small group so you get to know each other pretty well by the end of the day.  Masa explained what we were to do then we all had a go at Echo's trees.  Echo (the homeowner) was a very gracious hostess and provided burgers for lunch like I have never seen.  I am a big guy, but those burgers were huge! I would definateley do a pruning workshop again.
I purchased an Ohlendorfii Spruce at Coaldale Nursery on the way home so we will see how that does in our yard

Ward

Al

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2008, 04:39:00 PM »
Many thanks Ward,   It was a pleasure to have you there, asking questions and observing and commenting.....

It is very beneficial, to me, to have someone asking about so many things. It causes me to dig up info stored in the noggin that hasn't been accessed for quite some time ;D    Keeps the gray matter stimulated!

I am glad to hear the workshop went well.  Now you can have at your own yard without trepidation!!

Look forward to seeing you and Annie again.

Al


edzard

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #24 on: July 02, 2008, 10:00:32 PM »
Ward,..
my apologies for making possibilities more confusing. In a nutshell: waterfall or no waterfall? yes or no.
  hopefully that makes it easier..      :)  edzard

edzard

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #25 on: July 18, 2008, 12:16:20 PM »
Al...
today is the last day of maple pruning isn't it...? -> July 14 to 18th..
Is Masa back later in the year?
                        edzard

Al

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Re: Observing the Masters
« Reply #26 on: July 18, 2008, 05:07:31 PM »
Hi Edzard

Yes today was the last day of Maple pruning with Masa here.  I would normally have continued into the next week or so but must go and be Urban Forestry Foreman for the next 2 weeks, and then vacation for the 2 after that.

We accomplished what we had set out to do and the priority Maples look very good.

Masa will be back in September for the Communities in Bloom technical tour.  The judges are supposed to be at the garden on two occasions to learn more about this type of gardening.  Masa was asked to come and provide the information for them.

Thanks
Al

 

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