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Author Topic: Big Hello from England  (Read 3031 times)

TheTuNa

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Big Hello from England
« on: October 20, 2012, 10:55:55 AM »
Hi,

My names Steven, I'm 38 and from England. I've been suffering with Mental Health for many years. During that time I've became interested in Landscaping my front and back Gardens. They both currently are blank canvas' which I'm very much interested in turning them into Japanese themed gardens. I've recently purchased a book called Niwaki by Jake Hobson and since reading it many times over now I'm completely hooked on trying to grow my own trees similar to those found in Japan.

Anyway, Just wanted to drop by and say a Big Hello and hope to get to know you all more over time. Thanks for taking the time to read this.

Regards

Steven

edzard

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2012, 11:40:30 AM »
Steven welcome... if you liked Jake's first book, you'll learn to love his second...    ;D

http://oxoniangardener.co.uk/book-review-creative-pruning-jake-hobson-821/

when you get around to designing and installing the front and back Gardens, keep us in the loop, we love to see creativity and gardens...   they are as addictive as Jake's books and good pruning tools...   edzard

edzard

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2012, 11:42:31 AM »
p.s.   : what did you like the most about Jake's book NIWAKI?
was there something that caught your eye, or was it the ideas and possibilities, or, ?        edzard

K.T. Cannon-Eger

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2012, 12:34:21 PM »
Welcome Steven. You found a great book in Hobson's Niwaki. Edzard's recommendation was a featured book at our Hilo (Hawaii) public library last month.

george in the uk

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2012, 12:42:48 PM »
HI Steven,
Welcome to the forum, you will find plenty of ideas here for your new project.
George

TheTuNa

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2012, 05:23:08 AM »
Hi and Thanks for the welcomes...

@ Edzard - The thing that caught my eye they most was just how you can take pretty much any tree and turn it into a piece of art, almost similar to what you can achieve with a Bonsai but without the pot and on a much larger scale. I've never been very good with working on really small stuff and this for me would give me a project to get my teeth into. I've only ever seen a cloud shaped tree once before and always though to myself that one day I could create something similar if I put my mind to it. The fact that no two are the same make them very unique and the possibilities in each one are endless.

For me the trees add something totally different to a garden and that really excites me.


TheTuNa

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2012, 05:36:53 AM »
I'm Sorry if this is the wrong place to ask this question but wasn't sure it it would be ok to throw out a question on my 'Introduction thread'. If not please feel free to move it.

I've come across some small (Ilex Crenata) plants, 6-8" for £2.95 ea.

Would It be a good idea to start with something this small to develop, or should I look for one much bigger and more established when deciding on turning them into a cloud tree?

Any help to point me into the right direction would be Gratefully received.

Thanks in advance.

JamesT

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2012, 07:59:24 AM »
Hello Steven,

Welcome,  and good question.  In England you likely have a good cultural understanding of the range of size possibilities of Boxwood, which is a similar plant to many of the Ilex crenata.  The largest similar plant we encountered, is a 100 yr old (est.) boxwood, perhaps 18' tall, discovered in a neglected garden in eastern PA, which we layered in tree form (few branches, visible trunk).  Most often the garden use for younger plants of this dense growing type is in a form called tamamono, or a half domed solid.  So if you have the patience and perspective to think multi-generationally, it is possible to do as you ask.  Most prefer to encounter some of the garden form in a human scale within their lifetimes.  Purely a choice.

James

george in the uk

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2012, 10:38:50 AM »
Hi Steven,
Definitely something bigger than 8", it will take ages to get big enough to start to shape them. if you look at my garden all the trees and shrubs where saplings when I bought them but it takes years to get big enough to look something like.
George.

TheTuNa

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Re: Big Hello from England
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2012, 05:19:21 PM »
Hello Steven,

Welcome,  and good question.  In England you likely have a good cultural understanding of the range of size possibilities of Boxwood, which is a similar plant to many of the Ilex crenata.  The largest similar plant we encountered, is a 100 yr old (est.) boxwood, perhaps 18' tall, discovered in a neglected garden in eastern PA, which we layered in tree form (few branches, visible trunk).  Most often the garden use for younger plants of this dense growing type is in a form called tamamono, or a half domed solid.  So if you have the patience and perspective to think multi-generationally, it is possible to do as you ask.  Most prefer to encounter some of the garden form in a human scale within their lifetimes.  Purely a choice.

James


Hi Steven,
Definitely something bigger than 8", it will take ages to get big enough to start to shape them. if you look at my garden all the trees and shrubs where saplings when I bought them but it takes years to get big enough to look something like.
George.

Thank you for both for your comments. After consideration and a little more reading, I will look at something else. As this is going to be my first attempt at this, perhaps I should learn the skills of growing a tree of this shape on something that grows faster and isn't going to break the bank.

P.S.
@ george in the uk -  I think your website is very good and gives me many ideas of shapes and design. Thank you for sharing it and helps me understand more on what you're saying about buying small.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2012, 05:32:23 PM by TheTuNa »

 

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